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The Diestelhorst Bridge in Redding, California was built in 1914. When completed in 1915, it linked the county seats of Redding and Yreka. Today, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places...The bridge is 639 feet long and 24.3 feet wide, and has nine spans. It was named for Gotlieb Diestelhorst, whose family owned the land where it was built. Some of the family members even helped build the bridge...The bridge has the distinction of being the first bridge for automobiles and the first reinforced concrete bridge built across the Sacramento River in Northern California. It is now used as a pedestrian bridge for biking, hiking and other outdoor activities...The Lake Redding Bridge was built in 1997 as a modern update to the older bridge trying to maintain its look and feel. ..The Sacramento River, California's largest river flowing 375 miles, from Mount Shasta in the north through the Central Valley and the Delta to San Francisco Bay, this river constitutes an irreplaceable resource to Northern California's ecology...Boating, fishing, camping and swimming on the Sacramento and its reservoirs attract more than 8 million visitors a year. ..The 21-mile stretch from Redding to Balls Ferry is perfect for scenic touring and shorter trips. For the adventuresome, the breath-taking 33-mile stretch between Balls Ferry and Red Bluff is your ticket...The Sundial Bridge is actually a working Sundial is 700 feet long, 23 feet wide and 217 feet high (pylon). The bridge weighs 3.2 million pounds (1,600 tons) and is composed of steel with galvanized steel cables. The deck materials are non-skid glass panels in steel framework with granite accents. The foundation consists of 115 tons of rebar, 1,900 cubic yards of concrete and a superstructure of 400 tons of steel. 200 tons of glass and granite were utilized in deck construction. The bridge contains 4,342 feet of cable and the pylon is 580 tons of steel.
Copyright
Michael Burke
Image Size
4288x2848 / 8.2MB
Contained in galleries
Sacramento River Trail - Stock Art for Sale, Redding & Shasta County - Stock Art for Sale
The Diestelhorst Bridge in Redding, California was built in 1914. When completed in 1915, it linked the county seats of Redding and Yreka. Today, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places...The bridge is 639 feet long and 24.3 feet wide, and has nine spans. It was named for Gotlieb Diestelhorst, whose family owned the land where it was built. Some of the family members even helped build the bridge...The bridge has the distinction of being the first bridge for automobiles and the first reinforced concrete bridge built across the Sacramento River in Northern California.   It is now used as a pedestrian bridge for biking, hiking and other outdoor activities...The Lake Redding Bridge was built in 1997 as a modern update to the older bridge trying to maintain its look and feel. ..The Sacramento River, California's largest river flowing 375 miles, from Mount Shasta in the north through the Central Valley and the Delta to San Francisco Bay, this river constitutes an irreplaceable resource to Northern California's ecology...Boating, fishing, camping and swimming on the Sacramento and its reservoirs attract more than 8 million visitors a year. ..The 21-mile stretch from Redding to Balls Ferry is perfect for scenic touring and shorter trips. For the adventuresome, the breath-taking 33-mile stretch between Balls Ferry and Red Bluff is your ticket...The Sundial Bridge is actually a working Sundial is 700 feet long, 23 feet wide and 217 feet high (pylon). The bridge weighs 3.2 million pounds (1,600 tons) and is composed of steel with galvanized steel cables. The deck materials are non-skid glass panels in steel framework with granite accents. The foundation consists of 115 tons of rebar, 1,900 cubic yards of concrete and a superstructure of 400 tons of steel. 200 tons of glass and granite were utilized in deck construction. The bridge contains 4,342 feet of cable and the pylon is 580 tons of steel.